I2E Querying: License Consumption

February 23, 2015

There’s a variety of ways of running searches using I2E but for most purposes, the modes can be simplified to:

  1. Search using the I2E Java Client, and
  2. Everything else

This distinction is important for users, administrators and developers because access to querying is licensed in the same way. Today’s post will explain the differences between the two modes as well as how to make sure that you’re using your existing capabilities in the most efficient way, with reference to license pools, capabilities and user groups.

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Performing a Class Match using the API

June 25, 2014

Part of the I2E Enterprise installation is the Sample Web GUI — a Smart Query interface written as a web application that allows users to run smart queries using only their browser.

I2E Sample Web GUI

A neat trick that it performs is on-the-fly class matching: start typing in a word and the server starts to suggest terms in your dictionary that would match. So a search for “psor” will suggest Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, etc. Accepting the suggestion will then populate the search with that class rather than the word. The autosuggestion, dropdowns and tooltips are very nice from the user experience perspective, but today’s post will concentrate on the class match itself – how can a search for “psoriasis” retrieve a class match? Read the rest of this entry »


Retrieving Properties of a Published Query

February 27, 2014

Although I2E Queries and Multi Queries are binary objects, the I2E Web Services API provides an interface to a subset of the properties of those items, including some that can be modified when running a query programmatically.

Query properties that are read-only and that can be retrieved using the API include title, creator, comments and column headers. Query properties that can be modified before query submissions include number of hits, time limit and smart query parameters.

I2E has two, related, query resources: Saved Queries (that represent the binary files on disk, stored in the Repository) and Published Queries (that represent the Published location of the Saved Queries). To ensure that Users have permissions to see Query Properties, it is recommended that you only expose access to Published Queries.

Retrieving (by GET) a Published Query provides a “handle” to the Saved Query:

HTTP Header = X-Version: *, Accept: application/json
GET http://i2e.company.com:8334/api;type=published_query/QueryTree/Query1.i2q
Success 200

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I2E Query Notation

December 5, 2013

So, an I2E user has built a great query that detects side effects and adverse events for a drug. It looks ideal as a candidate for repeated use: for example, search MEDLINE whenever it is updated. The I2E user has also saved this query as a Smart Query, meaning the drug can be changed when the query is run. Changing the settings of a smart query in the I2E client is easy: type in a few words, click to add a class or load in a list of alternatives, or some combination of those options. So how can options like these be transferred to the I2E server as part of the query using the Web Services API? Read the rest of this entry »


Placing data on the I2E Server: POST or PUT?

October 30, 2013

Paul Milligan's TMS Presentation

The past few weeks have been busy: we’re fresh from our Text Mining Summit, which included a dedicated training session for users who wished to develop against the I2E Web Services API, and I also had the opportunity to go on site to a customer to provide some focused API training. These sessions generated lots of interesting questions about automating processes from an administration perspective as well as a user perspective.

As I was presenting some high-level slides during the Text Mining Summit, I noted that I was mixing up put and post (and sometimes place and push!) in a way that is forgivable when using them as English verbs, but unhelpful when trying to explain a RESTful Web Service. So after the Summit, I went back to our Developers Guide and back to my notes and started over, to create a helpful explanation of when you POST and when you PUT to the I2E Server.

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Only a few days until the Text Mining Summit!

October 2, 2013

There’s only a few days to go until the Linguamatics Text Mining Summit, which begins on 7th October in Newport RI. This is an opportunity for I2E users and other developers to get hands-on access to the new version of I2E — version 4.1 — as well as attend a variety of interesting presentations and a number of training sessions.

This year, there is a training session dedicated to I2E Administration and use of the Web Services API. You can meet up with individuals from other organizations who will share their experiences with our API, along with training material that covers the various parts of the API in sufficient details to start using it yourself. There will also be a case study on using the API to create workflows that integrate text mining. And, of course, lots of demos!

I look forward to seeing you there!

Paul


Submitting an I2E Query via API

July 30, 2013

Your most common usage of the I2E Web Services API is likely to be to automate query execution to generate results. Queries themselves are always constructed and refined in the I2E client interface; from there they can be saved onto the I2E server ready for batch processing. When running a query automatically you need to provide, as a minimum, two pieces of information: the location of the index and the location of the query. In this post we won’t worry too much about the index — we’ll assume that the index that the user originally used to create their query is still available — and focus on the query.

As saved by the user, the query contains sufficient information to specify the search itself (keywords, classes, phrases, etc.) as well as controlling the output settings, which will include (among other things) the format of the results (HTML, TSV, XML, etc) along with the ordering of results and selection of columns and highlighting. Read the rest of this entry »


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