Submitting an I2E Query via API

July 30, 2013

Your most common usage of the I2E Web Services API is likely to be to automate query execution to generate results. Queries themselves are always constructed and refined in the I2E client interface; from there they can be saved onto the I2E server ready for batch processing. When running a query automatically you need to provide, as a minimum, two pieces of information: the location of the index and the location of the query. In this post we won’t worry too much about the index — we’ll assume that the index that the user originally used to create their query is still available — and focus on the query.

As saved by the user, the query contains sufficient information to specify the search itself (keywords, classes, phrases, etc.) as well as controlling the output settings, which will include (among other things) the format of the results (HTML, TSV, XML, etc) along with the ordering of results and selection of columns and highlighting. Read the rest of this entry »

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Using the I2E Web Services API in your Application: Client Libraries

June 28, 2013
Client applications can independently control various I2E server tasks

Client applications can independently control various I2E Server tasks

When choosing to develop an application that uses I2E, it is important to understand the capabilities of our text mining software as well details of the API itself. As the graphic shows, tasks that are performed on the I2E Server are independent of each other and so allow diverse applications to be created: one app to run large-scale queries and present the information in a visual form in one example; another app to process documents automatically and publish the resulting indexing to the I2E Query GUI is another.

Today’s post is more about the latter: what are the basic details of the API itself; what languages are supported and what do we provide to get you started.

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Calling all developers: the I2E Web Services API is for you!

June 20, 2013

The release of I2E 4.0 at the end of 2012 included a Web Services API (WSAPI) for our software for the first time. The availability of this interface, along with sample code and a sample GUI, meant that it was possible for developers to include integration with I2E into their code.

We’ve used standard technologies when building our API but there are many software-specific features that need to be understood before you can choose what capabilities of I2E to include in your applications. For this, we are providing additional training materials such as training sessions at our Text Mining Summit, webinars, traditional phone and email support and, well, this blog.
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