Performing a Class Match using the API

June 25, 2014

Part of the I2E Enterprise installation is the Sample Web GUI — a Smart Query interface written as a web application that allows users to run smart queries using only their browser.

I2E Sample Web GUI

A neat trick that it performs is on-the-fly class matching: start typing in a word and the server starts to suggest terms in your dictionary that would match. So a search for “psor” will suggest Psoriasis, Psoriatic Arthritis, etc. Accepting the suggestion will then populate the search with that class rather than the word. The autosuggestion, dropdowns and tooltips are very nice from the user experience perspective, but today’s post will concentrate on the class match itself – how can a search for “psoriasis” retrieve a class match? Read the rest of this entry »

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Retrieving Properties of a Published Query

February 27, 2014

Although I2E Queries and Multi Queries are binary objects, the I2E Web Services API provides an interface to a subset of the properties of those items, including some that can be modified when running a query programmatically.

Query properties that are read-only and that can be retrieved using the API include title, creator, comments and column headers. Query properties that can be modified before query submissions include number of hits, time limit and smart query parameters.

I2E has two, related, query resources: Saved Queries (that represent the binary files on disk, stored in the Repository) and Published Queries (that represent the Published location of the Saved Queries). To ensure that Users have permissions to see Query Properties, it is recommended that you only expose access to Published Queries.

Retrieving (by GET) a Published Query provides a “handle” to the Saved Query:

HTTP Header = X-Version: *, Accept: application/json
GET http://i2e.company.com:8334/api;type=published_query/QueryTree/Query1.i2q
Success 200

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Placing data on the I2E Server: POST or PUT?

October 30, 2013

Paul Milligan's TMS Presentation

The past few weeks have been busy: we’re fresh from our Text Mining Summit, which included a dedicated training session for users who wished to develop against the I2E Web Services API, and I also had the opportunity to go on site to a customer to provide some focused API training. These sessions generated lots of interesting questions about automating processes from an administration perspective as well as a user perspective.

As I was presenting some high-level slides during the Text Mining Summit, I noted that I was mixing up put and post (and sometimes place and push!) in a way that is forgivable when using them as English verbs, but unhelpful when trying to explain a RESTful Web Service. So after the Summit, I went back to our Developers Guide and back to my notes and started over, to create a helpful explanation of when you POST and when you PUT to the I2E Server.

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